Comparison

Comparison - road test

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1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 964 vs. 1994 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 993

The air-cooled 911 market is constantly evolving and no model is immune from the gravitational pull of ever increasing values witnessed by the ever decreasing gap between the 964 and the 993.

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From 1974 Porsche 911 Carrera 2.7 to 1989 911 SC: why these are the 911s to buy now

From under-the-radar collector status to realistic daily-drive prospect, the G-Series is the air-cooled 911 of the moment. As it hits its 50th anniversary, Porsche authority. Steve Bennett tells us why.

Editor's comment
The 911s that make sense

When I was a pup – well, probably in my teens, which means my opinions were even more virulent yet even more unfounded – I didn’t much care for new Porsche 911s. You couldn’t blame me: I was born in 1968, so when I was most full of revolution and rebellion and looking for a system to smash, 911s were at their new-establishment peak, that thankfully brief window in the mid-80s when all the cliches were formed. Red-braces wearing yuppie a-holes going backwards into hedges in matching Guards Red impact-bumper 911s while swilling from a bottle of Pol was real (though perhaps rather less frequent than the tabloids made out). As was the 911’s guilt by association, sadly.

By the time I got into the classic car magazine game in the mid-90s, the big-bumper generation of Porsche was still unfashionable, all too often the cars were uncared for and poorly maintained daily drivers at the bottom of their value curve. They were what you bought if you couldn’t afford a ‘proper’ Porsche.

To those of us of a certain age, I guess they still are to a lesser degree, but to an only slightly younger generation of enthusiasts, the one that has also embraced all those 1970s shades of brown that still make my blood curdle – russet, sable, oatmeal et al – there seems to be no trace of that stigma. Of course, you suspect that they might change their minds the moment they have the wherewithal to test drive a 1968 S, but for now I am quite jealous that they can enjoy the later cars without all the social baggage that used to come with them, used to spoil them. That’s partially a comment on how quickly society and perceptions move on in the modern world, but mainly it’s testament to the longevity of a brilliant design.


Heck, the cars we are rightly celebrating this issue were in production so long that they easily outlived their own negative stereotypes in period. They emerged in 1974 and bowed out in 1989, they pretty much saw off their own succession plan when the front-engined cars came and went, and now they seem far more related to what came before than to what came after.

After all, with all the world’s 964s being hoovered up for restomods and 993s being sufficiently evolved to be an entirely different car, these G- (and on) Series 911s are suddenly looking extremely appealing in their own right rather than merely as an alternative to something you can’t afford. In the words of the wise Glen Waddington: ‘It’s the only “purebred” 911 that still exists in reasonable quantities and for almost sane money.’
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1992 Alpine A610 vs. 1997 Venturi Atlantique 260

In the 1990s, France produced a showdown between two glassfibre-bodied supercoupés with boosted Renault V6s: the Alpine A610 and Venturi Atlantique. Do they deserve to remain in perpetual obscurity?

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Porsche 911 Carrera RS 964 vs. TVR Griffith 500

Can the Porsche 911 Carrera RS 964 and TVR Griffith 500 truly be compared? They may seem poles apart, but this pair has more in common than you might think. Can the underdog from Blackpool hold the Stuttgart icon to account?

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1981 Alpina B7 S Turbo E12 vs. 1984 B7 Turbo E28 and 1991 B10 Bi-Turbo E34

As Alpina builds its last BMW 5 Series remix, we sample three of Buchloe’s legendary turbocharged autobahn annihilators.

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1953 Jaguar XK120 FHC vs. 1957 Aston Martin DB MKIII

007 very nearly got an E-type for the Goldfinger film — but he also came close to a Jaguar in the novel upon which it was based. Which of these original Goldfinger cars makes for the best classic experience today?

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1961 Maserati 3500 GT Spyder Vignale vs. 1965 Maserati Mistral 3700 Spyder

The Maserati 3500 GT Spyder Vignale and Mistral Spyder embody Italian grandeur in its most beautiful form – and could hardly be more different.

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Aston Martin Rapide vs. Bentley Flying Spur

Although undeniably good-looking and very fast, is the Aston Martin Rapide also spacious and luxurious enough to compete with the epitome of sumptuousness, a Bentley Flying Spur?

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1958 Citroen DS 19 vs. 1960 Simca Vedette Chambord


In the 1950s, automobiles were not only a means to display one's success but also a reflection of one's character. Buyers of the Citroën DS were known for their avant-garde taste and willingness to take risks, while those who favored the Simca Vedette were drawn to American influences and conservative engineering.

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Porsche 911 at 60: 2.4S v 996 GT3 v 992 GTS

Eight generations, countless m models and an unending commitment to sports car evolution. Total 911 celebrates the Neunelfer’s milestone anniversary by picking three cars that represent key moments in its 60 brilliant years.

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2024 BMW i4 M50 G26 vs. 2023 Hyundai IONIQ 6 Ultimate 77 kWh AWD, 2023 Tesla Model 3 Dual Motor All-Wheel Drive Long Range

Giant Test: Hyundai Ioniq 6 meets the G26 BMW i4 and Tesla Model 3. Can BMW’s M division repeat its combustion success in EVs? Can Hyundai leap to the top with the Ioniq 6? Or is the Model 3 still best?

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2003 Aston Martin DB7 Zagato Coupe vs. DB AR1 Roadster

Arriving late in the DB7’s production, the limited-edition Zagato coupe and DB AR1 roadster from 2002 and 2003 respectively were an Italian take on this very British sports car.

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2012 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet 991 vs. 2013 Boxster GTS 981

Welcome to the battle of the £50k Porsche soft-tops. In the silver corner is a 991 Cabriolet with killer spec. In the blue corner is a 981 Boxster GTS packing a potent punch. Which delivers the knockout blow?

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Aston Martin DB7 vs. Jaguar XJS

Despite coming from two different manufacturers, by sharing much below the surface, the DB7 and Jaguar XJS are closely related. We compare a straight six-engined example of each to discover which of these surprising siblings we prefer.

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